Press "Enter" to skip to content

Study Finds OxyContin Reformulation Resulted In Surge Of Hepatitis C

Reformulation of OxyContin (the pain medicine) in 2010 to make it harder to abuse directly resulted in a huge elevation in infections of hepatitis C as drug abusers switched to injectable heroin from the prescription medication, as per a new study by RAND Corporation.

While infection rates of hepatitis C elevated generally all over the nation during the years after the reformulation, scientists discovered that states with above-average OxyContin misuse rates before the reformulation witnessed increscent of infections for hepatitis C 3 times as quick as in different states.

Public health executives earlier have held responsible the shift to injectable heroin from prescription opioids as a cause of the increment in hepatitis C instances, but the new study offers the best proof till date of a direct connect between reformulation of OxyContin and the rise in infection. The results are posted in the February version of the Health Affairs journal.

Speaking of infection, using a multidisciplinary method, a global group of scientists from various institutions, comprising Baylor College of Medicine, discloses that complicated interactions between the microbiome and sugars in human milk control infection caused by neonatal rotavirus. Posted in the Nature Communications journal, this research offers new understanding of infections caused by rotavirus in babies and verifies maternal components that can enhance the performance of attenuated & live rotavirus vaccines.

“Rotavirus infection leads to vomiting and diarrhea majorly in kids younger than 5, with the exemption of babies less than 28 Days old, who usually have no signs. On the other hand, in some cases, infections in babies are related to severe gastrointestinal issues. What factors are distinguished among newborns without and with symptoms are not understood clearly,” claimed corresponding and first author Dr. Sasirekha Ramani, assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine for microbiology and molecular virology.