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Florida Prisons Getting Sued For Deleting Prisoner Music Buyouts

A prisoner from Florida prison is taking a legal action after a switch between contractors erased prisoners’ access to their own music worth millions of dollars. As media reported, William Demler filed a lawsuit against the FDOC (Florida Department of Corrections). As per Demler, FDOC falsely pledged to allow inmates purchase music permanently via one digital media supplier, then slashed their access to sign a more profitable agreement with another.

The complaint by Demler comprises digital music player program by Florida that allow inmates purchase a specially developed media player for a price tag of $119 or $99, then purchase different audiobooks or songs for $1.70 per stuff. The complaint states that prisons heavily tout the program, operated by Access Corrections, with commitments that inmates can forever keep songs. From 2011 to 2017, prisoners invested almost $11.3 Million to purchase 6.7 Million files altogether, and Demler himself invested almost $569 purchasing music.

On a related note, Governor of Alabama, Kay Ivey, earlier put a step forward to ban the jail food funds to shift into the pockets of sheriffs. Previously, sheriffs could take the remaining money after paying for meals of prisoners. Ivey instructed that the fund money cannot be taken by sheriffs for personal use. Instead, these excess funds will be either directly moved to the general funds of the county or in an account created for the official use of sheriffs. Ivey insisted in a statement that the public funds should be utilized for the public purposes only.

Sheriffs started the practice of keeping extra money to themselves from 2008 when Troy King, then-Attorney General, ruled that a sheriff can keep any surplus from the food service allowance as personal earnings. He had noted that almost majority of sheriffs in the state had retained the food service allowances for their personal income from past many years.