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US Commander: “I Don’t Recommend Selling Lockheed Martin’s Jets To Turkey”

Recently, the top U.S. military commander for Europe stated to Congress that the U.S. should not pursue a multi-billion dollar weapons deal of F-35 jets to Turkey if Ankara receives delivery of a superior Russian missile system. Army General Curtis Scaparrotti—Head of the U.S. European Command—asserted to members of the SASC (Senate Armed Services Committee), “My superlative military advice will be that we do not then pursue the F-35, working or flying it with associates that are functioning with Russian networks, mostly air defense systems.” Adding that there can be expected consequences, such as no prospect foreign military sales amid Washington and Ankara, Scaparrotti said, “I will expect that Turkey would think again over this one decision regarding the S-400.”

In 2017, Ankara inked a deal with Russia for the S-400 missile system, an agreement reportedly value $2.5 Billion. All this whole time, Turkey has aided in financing America’s most costly weapons system, which is the F-35 JSF (Joint Strike Fighter). In short, these two massive ticket weapons systems—the F-35 and the S-400—can be utilized against one another. Apparently, the Russian-made S-400 missile system—which is having 32 missiles and 8 launchers—is competent in targeting stealth warplanes such as the F-35 fighter. In September, CNBC stated that Turkey has started construction of a spot for the Russian missile system in spite of warnings from the U.S. to not purchase the platform, as per to a source having direct information of an intelligence report.

Recently, Lockheed Martin was in news for its $15 Billion deal with Saudi Arabia. Reportedly, Lockheed Martin has been granted a nine-figure down installment on a $15 Billion missile-defense network for Saudi Arabia, a step that must go a long way to easing apprehensions that the huge deal can be in danger due to tensions amid Saudi Arabia and western governments. The Pentagon has approved Lockheed Martin $945.9 Million for an overseas military sale to provide THAAD (Terminal High Altitude Area Defense) system long-lead items, training and testing, and preliminary system development and engineering.