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Scientists Investigate Stroke’s Effects On Microbiome

The latest study by Candice Brown and Allison Brichacek—from the WVU’s (West Virginia University) School of Medicine—indicates that stroke patients’ microbiomes—also the structure of their guts—might still be out of fitness a month later the stroke has passed. Brichacek—a doctoral student—said, “We are concerned about the gut-brain alignment, how the gut controls the brain and vice versa.” The study was presented at the ISC (International Stroke Conference) in February. Earlier studies showed the immediate effects of stroke on the microbiome, but they did not explore whether such effects stayed behind. To discover this, Brichacek along with colleagues induced a stroke in animal prototypes. The control group did not have a stroke. The scientists correlated the two groups’ microbiomes for 3 Days, 14 Days, and 28 Days post-stroke. They also inspected their intestines for tiny disparities.

One of the discoveries was that some family of bacteria—such as Bifidobacteriaceae—was less important in post-stroke replicas than in healthy ones both for 14 Days and 28 Days. These kinds of bacteria are known for helping digestive health and might be linked with superior outcomes in stroke patients. That might sound like awful news for individuals who have had a stroke, but the thrashing of Bifidobacteriaceae bacteria is not the only long-term alteration their microbiomes undergo.

On a similar note, recently, a study showed that ambulance nitroglycerin patch to reduce blood pressure did not recover stroke outcomes. Reducing blood pressure in the ambulance with the help of a nitroglycerin patch for alleged stroke did not reduce post-stroke disability, as per to a study. This study was presented at the American Stroke Association’s ISC, 2019. Earlier, two studies suggested that transdermal skin patch delivery of nitroglycerin may progress functional outcome and lower death rate if given very soon following clot-caused stroke or bleeding in the brain.